Eve Online Will Not Beat Me: Into The Abyss

Hello space traveller.

I’ve been wanting to turn my attention to making some isk lately; eve is a funny game, unlike many other MMOs, you can’t just safely farm and expect to turn a profit, there’s no grinding up to max level, so you have to get really creative to try and advance, or atleast get to a position where you can be comfortable. There are a ton of ways to do this with people you fly with, but very few ways to reliably drum up some money alone.

I live in wormhole space, which is the best kind of place to unfasten yourself, get in a small gang when the pings go out and brawl some ships in relative safety; with a good chance of getting a fight and coming out on top – but when you’re in a small corp, you spend a lot of time scanning out the chain, waiting for prey or running sites. This does not make for a favourable isk/hr.

So I’ve been trying my hand at abyssal sites. I brought up a couple of videos and articles, bought myself a little RLML Caracal and ran a couple of T1 filaments; they are really fun and provide a welcome diversion from spinning ships.

Feeling content that I had learned the ropes, I decided that I was going to build a T2/3 filament Osprey fit…I spent about 125 million isk on this little shield-tanked beauty, then headed into a T2 abyssal site (just to be safe).

It exploded on the 3rd wave. Turns out three HAM launchers don’t do the job. But like everything in eve, I learned my lesson, so I hopped back on to do some more reading and came across this article by Ashy In Space:

How 2 Krab Part 4

One of the fits in there is for a HAM sacrilege, which Lane Davaham assures me is the best ship in the game, so that’s my next step; if all goes well, I’ll try streaming on KrabKast (https://www.twitch.tv/krabkast) – let me know if you’ve had success running T4 sites in cheaper fits, or if you have any tips for a noob abyssal runner!

Till next time,

Fly safe.

Boboko Busanagi [BNYSE]

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me: Action; Reaction; Farmhole

Hello space traveller,

I have been doing an awful lot recently. The world seems to have gone a little bit mad, so there has been ample time to play some space games and ample need to escape into experiences that make us feel good!

Eve has been doing that for me in spades and has taught me an awful lot about how the game needs to be played. One of my corpmates, Lane Davaham, said something to me that really stuck in my mind about playing Eve: “This game requires patience” – and that is so true. Eve is a game where you can spend a few days fighting fleet after fleet and feeling totally drained with all the content, but also a game where you need to spend weeks just letting the game tick away, training skills or waiting for a plan to come to fruition.

This lesson has been a really hard to take onboard, especially when I don’t have that much time to invest into the game. I resolved myself to stay casual since I’ve returned, but it’s difficult not to feel left out when your corp goes on weekend-long ops that you can’t take part in, but that’s the way it goes. I just have to be happy with being involved with the things I can take part in, and set up my Eve experience so I can get the most out of the time I am able to invest.

To that end, our little side-project is progressing decently; it’s a farmhole – which, in true Eve fashion, has been hit with problem after problem.

We asked around and ended up being able to form an agreement with the owner of an Astra in a wormhole that met our specifications, so we could stay there until we were up and running. The moment we moved in however, another corp, set up a Raitaru and have been reffing our structure ever since. They don’t seem to be very committed to the endeavour though, as we’ve beaten them back multiple times and they aren’t running a full-time eviction operation.

So for the time being, we’re looking for another farmhole while we wait to see if the situation changes in the meantime.

I am planning on starting a little podcast/stream when we do get the farmhole up and running, because I’m really curious to see if people want to listen to a bored Englishman/Frenchman/Serbian shit-talk for hours while Krabbing.

Stay tuned, there’s loads going on!

Boboko Busanagi – BNYSE

Eve Online After-Action Report: The Serpent And The Bird.

This story starts some days before the actual battle.

I am a hauler. I love taking my DST and flying out to Jita to buy a few things, maybe bring back some supplies to the hole and fit out a cheeky ship or two. I’m also easily distracted by fitting, and it tends to come back to bite me on the backside. So there I was; sitting in Jita, buying this and that, maybe refitting an experimental and ill-fated Drake Navy Issue for one-on-one PvP, when the call goes up on voice Comms: “There’s a Nightmare in this hole. Form up, we’re gonna kill it.”

You have not seen someone operate the controls of a corvette so quickly in your life. I was 12 jumps out from our wormhole and every second was torture as I hear all my corpmates X-ing up in fleet and undocking to lay their trap. I arrived one minute too late and shipped into my Prophecy just as they got the kill. One billion isk, not a bad night’s work for those involved. All I could do is say to myself that I would be there for the next one.

Well, the next one came…”There’s a Rattlesnake and a Tengu in this hole. Form up, we’re gonna kill ’em.”

And I was in Jita; in my DST, messing around with fits, 9 jumps out.

You have never seen someone operate the controls of a corvette so quickly in your life…and I got podded by a gate-camp just as I entered the system with the wormhole chain entrance. I was then politely informed that a shuttle would be far faster, which turned out to be true as I dodged the belligerents the second time round and made it into the chain with just enough time to re-ship into my trusty Prophecy and undock in an effort to meet the fleet, who were assembled a few holes over.

The fleet itself was formed organically from what we had at the time, as there were only a few people online when the call went out. More and more people dropped in as the pings were posted and finally we had enough warm bodies to project a tactically complete trap; we had Logi, interdiction, DPS and eyes ready.

The aim was to track the Rattlesnake and its accompanying escort Tengu (who were ostensibly ratting in a neighboring system), and launch an assault when they hit a site.

The problem came when we realised that they had no idea we were coming. Our eyes had lost them in a hole beyond and we didn’t want to spook them by risking having a ship on D-scan; so the fleet waited and mulled their options.

Then, cut to me: minutes late and charging through wormholes like a madman, I symbolically X-ed up in fleet and jumped through into the next system – only to be met with an astero sitting on the other side…which then proceeded to target me. I knew that if this little Astero wasn’t immediately warping out from my Prophecy, then its buddies were on the way, so I immediately started yelling at the fleet, which proceeded to turn ’round and get on grid as ships from New Jovian Exploration Department [NJED] arrived (completely unrelated to our quarry) and proceeded to burn away half my armour before our own percussive diplomacy landed and they bugged out in the face of our fairly sizeable presence.

Our logi patched up my armour and we were together at last, the problem now was that the fleet had left the hole and there were no eyes on the side that contained our prize. We arrived and sat, debating what we should do; whether we should send someone in or just wait. Eventually the decision was made to have our Sabre and Purifier (Flown by Captain Cornfed and Der Schattengeist respectively) jump through to bubble the other side…when a most uncanny thing took place.

Splash. Splash.

Two pulses of the wormhole, meaning that two ships had jumped through and were now sitting cloaked for a maximum of 60 seconds on our side of the hole. They had just cross-jumped our ships.

We all held our breath as we heard confirmation of the bubble going up, waiting for them to pop into our overlay and dumbfounded with disbelief at our luck; then, sure enough, the Rattlesnake and the Tengu decloaked as our interdictor jumped back and popped a second bubble, cutting off their escape on both sides.

Immediately we scrammed their engines, holding them im place while our weapons scoured the large ratting platform and held off the Tengu, which was doling out it’s own dose of hate.

After some time, it became obvious that we were going to bring down the Rattlesnake, so the Tengu chose to break off and jump back through the hole. We all set course to follow, with the spectacular sight of the Rattlesnake’s reactors purging plasma into surrounding space behind us, but we were slow to approach. Only one of us made it through in time: Astronomocat was flying an Astero and quickly jumped through, She burned fast and tackled the bird, holding it long enough for us to catch up, in doing so however, she had little chance of escape and the Astero exploded seconds before the fleet arrived.

After bursting through and scramming the Tengu for a second time, all our weapons trained now upon the formidable ship, but it was more slippery still and tried a last time to evade our grasp, jumping through the wormhole back to where the wreck of its friend now floated listlessly.

But its gambit was no good as one by one, we jumped again, spotting the craft making for the edge of the bubble. It was now only a matter of time as our warp scramblers took hold and the targeting locks snapped into place.

The rest of the story is numbers as our DPS eventually overcame the Tengu’s tank; a cheer went up as an explosion ripped across our screens. Our operation had prevailed, the adrenaline of the moment coursed and as the killmail came in, we only then realised the magnitude of what we had done.

As it turns out, the two ships were blinged quite substantially and after looting, we made off with a few hundred millions in modules.

I won’t be so blatant as to mention the value of the killmail, as doing so feels a little crass, but I will link it below. Definitely worth a look.

So concludes the story of The Serpent And The Bird; a most successful little op.

https://zkillboard.com/related/31001640/202004080200/

StarFight: Chronicles – Part One – Awaken To Dust

Neko’s eyes flickered open and she squinted as several red lights blinking angrily at her. She could hear nothing but a dull buzz in her ears; she quickly surveyed the information panel of the emergency Lifecapsule she found herself in.

Well that’s a surprise, I’m alive.

The red lights indicated that a number of systems inside the ship were destroyed or broken in some way, but Neko could feel no acceleration, so she assumed the ship must have landed somewhere on the dust-ball of a planet she’d been scanning. Time to think; the Lifecapsule wouldn’t release her until it knew she was safe, so either she would have to wait until the emergency sensors completed their sweep, or she would have to override the controls and just take the chance.

She reached up tentatively to the console and accessed her vitals; the fact that she wasn’t feeling any pain could be misleading, her Lifecapsule would have shot her full of drugs pre-emptively, but sure enough she was pretty much fine: two bones in her left hand were fractured and she was massively bruised on her left side but there was no internal bleeding, no dislocation and no nerve damage. She accessed the emergency sensors and the sweep was stuck on 60 percent; the node must have been damaged, but she knew from her earlier orbital scans that the planet was breathable and the surface gravity was almost one gee.

Nothing for it.

She punched in the override code, every button press was followed by a visual and auditory warning, but with a whine and a pop, the explosive bolts fired and the door flew away, smashing into the far bulkhead and going no further; strong magnets in the door held it firm.

She pushed herself forward and took a sluggish step into the cabin. Her body felt heavy due to painkillers but her mind was sharp enough. She needed to know if the computer was still working; it was dark in the ship, she reached for her mag light but felt only bare thigh, she had forgotten that the Lifecapsule tore every scrap of cloth from anyone inside, to easily access the patient. No problem, her spare was in a compartment on the opposite wall.

Which is now magnetically sealed behind the capsule’s door.

Neko groaned and felt her way towards what she hoped was the cockpit, her night vision was beginning to kick in, but it didn’t have a lot to work with; windows in spaceships are a luxury this model did not possess. Neko cursed her sluggish footsteps as she thunked into a wall, her hands ran over the metallic surface and her finger found a long groove, she pushed hard and after a second the mag-lock released and the door to the cockpit slid open with a grinding noise.

That didn’t sound good.

Red light washed over her as she stepped inside and surveying the scene, she was glad to find it was more or less intact; two bulkheads looked to have buckled slightly, causing control panels and storage compartments alike to burst open, strewing cables, clothes and food all over. Neko waded her way through the morass before her stomach jabbed her mind and she knelt to pick up a ration pack before continuing on.

Neko practically fell into her flight chair, the painkillers seemed to be wearing off and she started to feel like she’d been beaten with an angry stick. Reaching forward she keyed in her passcode before tearing into the ration pack and waiting for the bootup sequence to finish. She was chewing on what seemed to be some dried meat analogue when the computer made a happy sound and the screen flashed up.

Neko made a low whistle as fifty two errors pulsed politely in the top left corner of the screen, she filed through them: Engines, weapons, navigation, most of the sensors, peripheral systems and all but two external cameras were dead. She accessed the functional cameras, the first showed blackness and the next showed her surroundings.

It looked as if she’d crashed belly first into some kind of muddy lake, she swivelled the camera, it would only turn sixty degrees or so but on the edge of it’s vision she could see some sort of thick vegetation. Okay, not such a dust-ball after all. The small yellow sun shone harshly down onto the now drying mud that had piled up in front of the craft. With the realisation that she was in no immediate danger, she slouched back and took another bite of the meat stick while idly keying a few buttons.

Ofcourse the air conditioning is broken.

The ambient temperature prediction was 96 degrees in the next 6 hours due to the sun’s oppressive rays. She was going to boil alive in her own ship unless she got out soon.; at least it looked as if the fission cells were operational, she had years of power if she needed it.

I really hope I don’t.

To be continued! This has been part one of the first chapter of my scifi epic – Starfight: Chronicles. I’ve been working on the setting for quite a few years and I’m happy to finally present it publicly. I’ll be posting more soon!